Infographic by Tania Lili
Infographic by Tania Lili

Though the peak of the pandemic might be behind us, Michigan still faces stark milestones in terms of deaths and infections. And coronavirus deaths aren’t the only deaths spiking.

MICHIGAN — The now-familiar refrain of social distancing and flattening the curve appears to have yielded major returns as daily cases and deaths related to the novel coronavirus continue to hold steady in Michigan this week.

Wednesday’s update reported 103 deaths, down day-over-day from Tuesday’s 120. Cases were slightly higher that Tuesday, up to 1,137 from 1,052.

That steady rise doesn’t mean Michigan is spared grim milestones, though. On the eve of a protest to end the state of emergency declaration in Michigan, the total number of confirmed cases passed 40,000. Detroit also surpassed 1,000 deaths.

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The total cases as of Wednesday are 40,399 with 3,670 deaths. That makes a Case Fatality Rate just shy of 9.1%. Though slow, the CFR is still steadily climbing. 

Michigan is still falling far short of the goal of 15,000 tests per day, peaking so far at 8,847 last Thursday. As the number of tests done per day rises, the percent of those tests coming back positive has fallen, hovering around 12%. 

But levelling off is a positive sign. The goal in a pandemic is the now-familiar phrase “flatten the curve”, meaning to reduce the rate at which new cases arise to prevent overburdening hospital systems and buy more time to treat each case. Michigan’s past week shows a significant pattern of flatter curves in both cases and deaths.

Though Michigan has not met any of the White House’s gating criteria for economic re-engagement, as The ‘Gander reported, this promising trend positions the state to look at next steps in slowly shaking off the stay-at-home orders in place to slow the virus’ spread. 

The first wave of Michigan’s economic revitalization plan, MI Safe Start, was announced Monday and explored in-depth by The ‘Gander broke down forecasts for various industries and the rationale behind the plan

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The New York Times reports that data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention show that the pandemic has increased deaths from non-coronavirus causes as well. In Michigan, the data shows, provisional death from all causes spiked far above normal from March 8 through April 11. This shows that increased stress on the medical system from the pandemic has cost lives endangered by causes that had nothing to do with the coronavirus. 

As the systems remain stressed, those deaths too will remain high. 

According to the daily update from the state, the county-level breakdown is as follows:

  • Alcona: 4  
  • Allegan: 94 (2 deaths)  
  • Alpena: 76 (4 deaths)
  • Antrim: 10 
  • Arenac:18 (1 death)  
  • Barry: 34 (1 death)
  • Bay: 102 (2 deaths)
  • Benzie: 6
  • Berrien: 242 (15 deaths)
  • Branch: 56 (2 deaths)
  • Calhoun: 219 (11 deaths)
  • Cass: 29 (2 deaths)
  • Charlevoix: 13 (1 death)
  • Cheboygan: 17 (1 death)
  • Chippewa: 2
  • Clare: 11 (1 death)
  • Clinton: 117 (9 deaths)
  • Crawford: 54 (4 death)
  • Delta: 13 (2 deaths)
  • Dickinson: 3 (2 deaths)
  • Eaton: 124 (6 deaths)
  • Emmet: 21 (2 deaths)
  • Genesee: 1564 (180 deaths)
  • Gladwin: 16 (1 death)
  • Gogebic: 4 (1 death)
  • Grand Traverse: 19 (5 deaths)
  • Gratiot: 13 (1 death)
  • Hillsdale: 121 (17 deaths)
  • Houghton 2
  • Huron: 16
  • Ingham: 446 (10 deaths)
  • Ionia: 60 (2 deaths)
  • Iosco: 47 (4 death)
  • Isabella: 60 (7 deaths)
  • Jackson: 351 (19 deaths)
  • Kalamazoo: 348 (12 deaths)
  • Kalkaska: 17 (2 deaths)
  • Kent: 1,395 (33 deaths)
  • Lake: 2
  • Lapeer: 167 (25 deaths)
  • Leelanau: 10
  • Lenawee: 92 (1 death)
  • Livingston: 335 (18 deaths)
  • Luce: 1
  • Mackinac: 6
  • Macomb: 5,430 (597 deaths)
  • Manistee: 11
  • Marquette: 45 (8 deaths)
  • Mason: 8
  • Mecosta: 14 (1 death)
  • Menominee: 5
  • Midland: 59 (5 deaths)
  • Missaukee: 15 (1 death)
  • Monroe: 284 (12 deaths)
  • Montcalm: 38 (1 death)
  • Montmorency: 5
  • Muskegon: 262 (15 deaths)
  • Newaygo: 22
  • Oakland: 7,159 (668 deaths)
  • Oceana: 9 (1 death)
  • Ogemaw: 12
  • Osceola: 4
  • Oscoda: 4 
  • Otsego: 90 (8 deaths)
  • Ottawa: 224 (9 deaths)
  • Presque Isle: 12
  • Roscommon: 15
  • Saginaw: 632 (56 deaths)
  • Sanilac: 34 (4 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft: 3
  • Shiawassee: 173 (8 deaths)
  • St Clair: 313 (21 deaths) 
  • St Joseph: 30 (1 death)
  • Tuscola: 98 (13 deaths)
  • Van Buren: 46 (2 deaths)
  • Washtenaw: 1,049 (59 deaths)
  • Wayne: 16,494 (1,727 deaths) (Detroit alone has 8,957 cases and 1,008 deaths)
  • Wexford: 10 (2 deaths)
  • Michigan Department of Corrections: 1,264 (41 deaths)
  • Federal Corrections Institute: 86 (1 death)
  • Out of State: (39)

Total: 40,399 cases, 3,670 deaths

The Times reports 1,012,683 Americans have confirmed cases of the coronavirus as of Wednesday, and 53,034 have died.

While Michigan announced the capacity to get tests to everyone who needed them last week, it may be June before the same can be said at the national level. One of the nation’s top experts on the pandemic, Dr. Anthony Fauci, set the end of May or start of June as the timeframe for that objective, reports Axios

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“Hopefully, we should see that as we get toward the end of May, the beginning of June,” Fauci said to CNN’s Jake Tapper. “That’s what I’m being told by the people who are responsible for the testing. I take them for their word. If that doesn’t happen, I’m going to go to them and say, ‘What happened here? Why didn’t it happen and how can we fix it.'”

And as CNBC reports, this pandemic might be laying the groundwork for the next, very different global crisis. The United Nations has warned that famines of “biblical proportions” could dramatically spike world hunger in the coming months as a direct consequence of the coronavirus pandemic. The UN projects 265 million people will face acute food insecurity by the end of 2020.