Artifacts rescued from the Doan History Center in Midland. (Photo via GoFundMe)
Artifacts rescued from the Doan History Center in Midland. (Photo via GoFundMe)

Flooding in Mid-Michigan has left wreckage in its wake. The Historical Society of Michigan is ensuring that Midland’s history isn’t lost among it.

MIDLAND, MI — The Historical Society of Michigan is not about to let floodwaters wash away Mid-Michigan’s past. 

The group is working to raise funds through a GoFundMe campaign for two of their member historical organizations in the area, the Midland County Historical Society’s Doan Center and the Sanford Centennial Museum. Both were damaged by flooding caused by heavy rains that preceded the failures of two nearby dams. 

Money raised by the campaign, which seeks to raise at least $10,000, will go toward preserving and restoring damaged property and salvageable artifacts and collections.

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The Historical Society of Michigan said it will withdraw the funds from the campaign and convey them to the Midland County historical organizations most affected by the flooding.

Nearly a dozen of the buildings that make up the Sanford Centennial Museum complex were damaged starting May 19.

The Doan History Center, where most of the Midland County Historical Society archives are stored, took in an estimated 24 inches of water. A portion of the archives sustained significant damage as a result.

“The Sanford museum is a volunteer-run organization and is in desperate need of help and donations to save their collections,” reads the GoFundMe page. “The Midland County Historical Society also suffered greatly in this disaster. Flooded storage areas damaged precious historical archives and artifacts.

“ … Donations received through this GoFundMe campaign will go directly toward the preservation and restoration of damaged property and salvageable artifacts and collections.” 

As of June 1, the Historical Society of Michigan has raised over $7,500 including direct donations. 


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