Clockwise from top left: Michigan Science Center (photo via Wikimedia Commons); Explore the universe at the Michigan Science Center (Photo via Facebook); The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History (Photo by Juan N Only via Flickr); “Self-Portrait with Monkey” by Frida Kahlo (1938) is on loan to the DIA from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y. for "Guests of Honor: Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí." (Image via Facebook); Visitors will be able to walk the steps and enter the Detroit Institute of Arts this Friday. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)
Clockwise from top left: Michigan Science Center (photo via Wikimedia Commons); Explore the universe at the Michigan Science Center (Photo via Facebook); The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History (Photo by Juan N Only via Flickr); “Self-Portrait with Monkey” by Frida Kahlo (1938) is on loan to the DIA from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y. for "Guests of Honor: Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí." (Image via Facebook); Visitors will be able to walk the steps and enter the Detroit Institute of Arts this Friday. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

The DIA, Michigan Science Center, and more open these must-see exhibits to visitors July 10. Wear your mask!

DETROIT, MI — July is National Anti-Boredom Month, and in just a few days, some of Detroit’s most beloved, groundbreaking, and renowned arts and culture institutions will reopen for visitors to explore safely. Talk about boredom busters!

On July 10, many of the institutions in the Cultural Center Historic District will restart operations nearly four months after closing their collections to the public due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

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Midtown Cultural Connections reports the district has been working with NSF International since April to construct a multi-phase reopening guide. The Cultural Center Historic District is located in Midtown Detroit along Woodward Avenue and includes the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, the Detroit Historical Museum, the Michigan Science Center, and more. 

“We know that the long-term health and safety of our cultural institutions is currently tied to ensuring the health and safety of all visitors and staff,” Susan Mosey, executive director of Midtown Detroit, Inc., told Midtown Cultural Connections. “We engaged NSF to help us create a safety culture and protocols for managing the risks associated with a communicable disease while helping institutions deliver their core missions.”

Each institution will have new universal practices, protocols, and recommendations in place for staff and visitors’ safety during the coronavirus pandemic. The reopening guide will be continually updated as more information about the virus and its spread becomes available. 

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What Visitors Can Expect 

  • Cleaning and disinfection of public spaces and work areas will be expanded.
  • Frequent handwashing is encouraged. Hand sanitizing stations will be made available throughout the institutions.
  • Visitors ages three and up will be required to wear masks inside each building. 
  • Cashless and touchless transactions will be made available wherever possible.
  • Some institutions will limit hours and occupant capacities and adjust entry procedures.
  • New wayfinding around the buildings and guidelines for physical distancing will be present to safely navigate the institutions.

Officials encourage the public to check the official website of the institution they plan to visit for the most up-to-date information. Some are individually rolling out special membership opportunities, timed ticketing, virtual programming, and more as part of their reopening schedule. 

We’ve put together a handy guide to the institutions opening in Detroit’s Cultural Center Historic District this Friday. Here, you can find homepages, hours of operation, and the exhibits you can’t miss once you can get in. 

MORE FUN: Skipping Big Summer Fests? Check Out Detroit’s Spectacular Outdoor Art Installations Instead.

Check Out These Exhibits in Detroit’s Cultural Center Historic District:

Sneaks of all shapes and sizes are on display at The Carr. (Photo via Facebook)

The Carr Center Contemporary

Wednesday – Saturday: Noon – 5 p.m. 

“Grails: The Sole and Black Culture” explores the intimate link between sneaker culture and the African American experience, according to The Carr’s website. It features “some of the hottest vintage and contemporary sneaker designs” — so if you’re looking to peep some inspiring kicks, grab your mask and make it out there. 

Here’s a glimpse of QUEEN: From the Collection of CCH Pounder. (Photo via Facebook)

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History 

Thursday – Saturday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. 

Sunday: Noon – 5 p.m. 

Don’t skip over any of the exhibits at this institution. Right now, QUEEN: From the Collection of CCH Pounder celebrates Black womanhood by featuring a variety of artwork by Africans, African Americans, and artists from other parts of the Diaspora — all from the personal collection of actress CCH Pounder. Permanent exhibitions offer comprehensive looks at the history of African American resilience alongside artifacts and stories from inspiring figures in arts, culture, science, technology, engineering, leadership, and more.

The Detroit Historical Museum’s Streets of Old Detroit exhibit captures the look of the city around the turn of the twentieth century. You may remember it from grade school field trips. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

Detroit Historical Museum 

Thursday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

Sunday: 1-5 p.m. 

Detroit: The “Arsenal of Democracy.” One of the museum’s signature permanent exhibits, it explores the ways that Detroit shaped the outcome of World War II — and how the war changed Detroit. But all of the museum’s exhibits are worth examining in both historical and contemporary contexts. What’s your take on the “Arsenal of Democracy” nickname in 2020? 

The DIA is currently exhibiting photographs from their personal collections in “Guests of Honor: Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí.” (Photo via DIA’s Facebook page)

Detroit Institute of Arts

Wednesday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. (9-10 a.m. for at-risk visitors) 

Saturday – Sunday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.  

It’s too bad that the DIA’s fascinating co-exhibition of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí paintings has been closed off to the public for months now, because their works in conversation must truly be a sight to behold. According to the DIA’s website, the artists’ works are presented alongside photographs from the museum’s collection, documenting the artists’ imaginative, larger-than-life personae.

No one can deny the influence of Greek culture on Michigan. And we wouldn’t have it any other way! (Image via hellenicmi.org)

Hellenic Museum of Michigan 

Saturday – Sunday: 1-5 p.m.

The Hellenic Museum’s permanent exhibits are evergreen, including “The History of Detroit’s Greektown” and “Greek Music and Greek Bands of Detroit.” But don’t miss their current special exhibition on Greece’s critical role in Nazi Germany’s defeat, or their upcoming look at the stories of Greek immigration to Michigan. 

If you’re lucky, you might spot the Sun itself at the Sun, Earth and Universe exhibit! (Photo via Facebook)

Michigan Science Center

Thursday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Don’t let your budding astronaut miss the Sun, Earth and Universe exhibit at the Michigan Science Center. It’s presented in collaboration with NASA and the National Informal STEM Education Network (NISE Net). It prompts kids to ask questions about the Solar System, how Earth is changing — and whether we’re alone in the universe. It’ll be a ponderous ride home, that’s for sure! 

 The 2020 Gilda Snowden Memorial Exhibition at The Scarab Club featured numerous talented artists. (Photo via Facebook)

The Scarab Club Art Gallery

Wednesday – Sunday: Noon – 5 p.m.

This week, the Scarab Club is installing a new exhibition of contemporary fiber artworks called “Uncommon Threads,” juried by textile designer Jeremy Noonan

Other famous members of Detroit’s Cultural Center Historic District, The Detroit Public Library, International Institute of Metropolitan Detroit, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD), will have different reopening dates but will follow a similar reopening plan. Check back soon for more info.