Important deadlines are looming for Michigan voters who plan to cast ballots in November's election. Photo via Shutterstock
Important deadlines are looming for Michigan voters who plan to cast ballots in November's election.

From in-person voting to mailing in your ballot, here are the dates you need to know to make your vote count in the November election. 

MICHIGAN—Michiganders can now cast absentee ballots at their local clerk’s office in person, but other voting options like using the mail and going to your polling place on Election Day are still available.

Here are the Michigan deadlines you need to know for voting.

SEE ALSO: The ‘Gander’s Guide to Voting in Michigan in 2020

October 2

This is the last date to request your absentee ballot and receive it in the mail in time for the election, according to the US Postal Service (USPS). Because of recent mail delivery delays, Michigan voters are asked to request ballots by Oct. 2 to allow postal workers plenty of time for delivery.

October 16

USPS recommends mailing your completed absentee ballot back to your local clerk no later than Oct. 16 to allow enough time for delivery. Ballots postmarked after Nov. 2 will not be counted.

READ: ‘I’m Accountable to the Voters:’ A Day in the Life of Lansing’s County Clerk

October 30 

The last day to receive your absentee ballot by mail is Oct. 30, according to USPS recommendations. If you have not received your absentee ballot by Oct. 30, consider casting an absent voter ballot in-person at your local clerk’s office, or casting a traditional ballot at your assigned  polling place on Election Day.

November 2

If you plan to return your absentee ballot by mail, it must be postmarked no later than Nov. 2 in order to be counted for the election. Local clerks will process and count ballots for up to two weeks following Election Day. 

Ballots received after Election Day will still be counted as long as they are postmarked in time.

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Graphic by Desiree Tapia

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