In this May 5, 2020 file photo, Angela Beauchamp fills out an absentee ballot at City Hall in Garden City, Mich. Michigan county and municipal clerks are finding it challenging to meet the needs of voters amid the coronavirus pandemic and following changes in 2018 when state voters approved of same-day voter registration and no-reason absentee voting. The Secretary of State’s office reported this week that over 1.5 million requests for absentee ballots have been made ahead of the Aug. 4 primary, more than three-and-a-half times the number than at the same time ahead of the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
In this May 5, 2020 file photo, Angela Beauchamp fills out an absentee ballot at City Hall in Garden City, Mich. Michigan county and municipal clerks are finding it challenging to meet the needs of voters amid the coronavirus pandemic and following changes in 2018 when state voters approved of same-day voter registration and no-reason absentee voting. The Secretary of State’s office reported this week that over 1.5 million requests for absentee ballots have been made ahead of the Aug. 4 primary, more than three-and-a-half times the number than at the same time ahead of the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Whether you choose to cast your ballot in person now or on Election Day, this guide will help you know your voting rights.

LANSING, MI—Voters began casting absentee ballots (also referred to as absent voter ballots) in Michigan for the 2020 general election more than a week ago at their local clerk’s office and by mail-in voting.

In a year that was almost impossible to prepare for, some things are still predictable and fairly easy to plan for—like the electoral process.

Whether planning to vote early or on Election Day, here’s what you in-person voters need to bring with them to the polls.

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Early, In-Person Voters

Both your local clerk and your election inspectors at your assigned polling location will ask you to present a photo ID when voting. If you do not have a photo ID, you can still vote in Michigan.

Should you forget your photo ID, Michigan election officials will require you to sign a form that certifies your identity and explains that you were without ID when voting. It’s still a good idea to bring a form of identification when voting. In Michigan that includes:

  • Michigan driver’s license or state ID
  • Student identification with photo from a high school or accredited college
  • Tribal identification card with photo

Click here to find your local clerk’s office in Michigan.

RELATED: Everything Military (and Their Families) Need to Know About Voting in Michigan

Election Day Voters

Voting identification rules are no different on Election Day than they are for early voters. Should you forget or be without photo identification on Election Day, you can still vote in Michigan. Polling location election inspectors will require voters to sign the same affidavit as local clerks for early voters.

It is still a best practice to bring a valid form of photo identification to the polls, if possible. That includes the following in Michigan:

  • Federal or state government-issued photo ID
  • U.S. passport
  • Military photo ID

Click here to find your polling location.

If you are turned away when trying to vote, file a complaint with the ACLU of Michigan.

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