Detroit resident Keith Combs votes and believes that other Black men, especially the youth, should, too. Photo provided by Keith Combs
Detroit resident Keith Combs votes and believes that other Black men, especially the youth, should, too.

Detroiter Keith Combs voted in his youth and still does today. He encourages other young Black men to make their vote count, too.

DETROIT—Detroit resident Keith Combs, 57, proudly served in the United States Marine Corps from July 1983 until May 1987. 

Combs reflected on his younger years in a conversation with The ‘Gander and said that as a Democrat “through and through” he has “always voted Democratic,” and this election was no different. 

He was 18-years-old when he voted for the first time nearly four decades ago, when the world moved at a much slower pace.

It was 1984 and “Footloose” by Kenny Loggins was playing on the radio, along with “Hello” by  Lionel Richie. “Ghostbusters” was in theaters and a new car cost $6,294.

“I first voted in 1984, I believe, for Walter Mondale,” Combs said. “It was my first year in the United States Marine Corps stationed in Jacksonville, NC.”

Mondale is an American politician, diplomat, and lawyer who served as the 42nd vice president of the United States from 1977 to 1981.

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Combs’ advice for younger voters is to “take a good look” at the current president. 

“Our nation has suffered over 229,000 losses of Americans to a virus that did not have to happen in a country as great as ours with all the technology that we are capable of. Vote because this is America and we are still a country of morals and values,” Combs said. 

Today, Combs says that he votes because too many people gave their lives for the right to vote. 

“I have voted already [this year] and Joe Biden is encouraging. We must return this nation to a caring nation that is supportive of all,” Combs said. “My service doesn’t impact how I vote, because I believe we should in accordance with who we can most identify with.”

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