Rep.-elect Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., pauses to speak to media as she walks from member-elect briefings and orientation on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Rashida Tlaib
Rep.-elect Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., pauses to speak to media as she walks from member-elect briefings and orientation on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

All members of the “The Squad” are predicted to hold their seats as the US map begins to resemble a 2016 replica.

DETROIT — Detroit political icon Rashida Tlaib (D-13) has secured her sophomore term in the US House of Representatives.

Tlaib successfully campaigned against the little-known Republican challenger, David Dudenhoefer, in a race that most called in her favor after she defeated Democrat contender, Brenda Jones, in the August primary.

Tlaib came to national prominence as a progressive politician during her first bid for House in 2018. The year saw a record number of Demorcratic and women of color candidates running for office in opposition to the undercurrent of racism coming from the White House since President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

Tlaib famously—or infamously—pledged to impeach the president at first opportunity at a celebration after her 2019 installation.

*WARNING: Graphic language

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Before a coincidental photo taken with fellow freshmen congress members Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ayanna Presley (D-Mass.), and Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) forever cemented Tlaib as a member of the “The Squad,” she worked on behalf of the often neglected residents of Detroit’s 12th district.

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Tlaib fights for basic human rights for her constituents, taking her arguments for clean air and fair wages from Detroit to Washington, DC. She also works to build the health of the local economy, advocating for the formation of public banks and other economic opportunities that would make communities throughout Southwest Detroit less dependent on outside assistance.

A Detroiter through and through and the daughter of Palestinian immigrants, Tlaib was born on the city’s southwest side and educated at Wayne State University. After graduating from Western Michigan University with a law degree, she returned to the city where she worked at the Sugar Law Center for Economic and Social Justice, a firm that offers free legal services to Michigan workers.

She made history as Michigan’s first first Muslim woman to serve in the State House, where she fought for equitable access to healthcare and wrote legislation to improve life for everyday Michiganders. 

Detroiters affectionately refer to the lawmaker by her first name, which she always welcomes. The legislator spent the majority of her first term protecting families in her district from inhumane ICE procedures and sweeps, and fighting for greater economic access.

“It’s long past time to open doors for people who have been systematically shut out, and provide a better option for those grappling with the costs of simply trying to participate in an economy they have every right to,” Tlaib said in a statement regarding recent legislation she and Ocasio-Cortez introduced allowing the creation of public banks. “[The economy] has been rigged against them.” 

With little more than half of the ballots counted, Tlaib herself is remaining quiet. Social media, however, is already celebrating an upcoming second term.

Tlaib will serve another two-year term, beginning January 2021. Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson expects to certify election results by Friday, Nov. 6.

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