Aimee Stephens talks during in an interview in Ferndale, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. The Supreme Court will hear Stephens' case Oct. 8 over whether federal civil rights law that bars job discrimination on the basis of sex protects transgender people. Other arguments that day deal with whether the same law covers sexual orientation. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya) Aimee Stephens
Aimee Stephens talks during in an interview in Ferndale, Mich., Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. The Supreme Court will hear Stephens' case Oct. 8 over whether federal civil rights law that bars job discrimination on the basis of sex protects transgender people. Other arguments that day deal with whether the same law covers sexual orientation. Amid their annual vigils for transgender homicide victims, trans-rights activists in the U.S. are trying to maintain long-term optimism even as many hard-won protections are under threat. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Stephens died weeks before the US Supreme Court decided she was protected under civil rights law. Now her former employer has to pay up.

DETROIT—A Detroit-area funeral home has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle a lawsuit that led to a groundbreaking decision that protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment.

Aimee Stephens, 59, died weeks before the US Supreme Court in June said she was covered by federal civil rights law.

Stephens worked as an embalmer and funeral home director at R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Homes in Garden City. She was fired in 2013 when she told her boss that she no longer wanted to be recognized as a man. She said she wanted to be known as Aimee and would report to work wearing a conservative skirt suit or dress.

Stephens’ boss said her appearance would be a distraction for grieving families.

The business is paying $130,000 to Stephens’ estate, plus $120,000 in legal costs and fees. U.S. District Judge Sean Cox approved the settlement Monday, The Detroit News reported.

Harris Homes will also begin providing clothing benefits to female employees, a benefit that had previously been available only to men, the newspaper reported.

RELATED: How Michigander Aimee Stephens Helped Make History for LGBTQ Rights