On Jan. 6, 2021, violent insurrectionists attacked the US Capitol, seeking to block the certification of the 2020 presidential election results. Their effort failed, but not before they brutally attacked police officers, hunted lawmakers, and carried out a dangerous attack that left five people dead. (Photo by ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images)
On Jan. 6, 2021, violent insurrectionists attacked the US Capitol, seeking to block the certification of the 2020 presidential election results. Their effort failed, but not before they brutally attacked police officers, hunted lawmakers, and carried out a dangerous attack that left five people dead. (Photo by ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images)

The findings come as the US House Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack will hold the first of six public hearings Thursday night in primetime. Sixty-five percent of voters support the House investigation, while only 28% oppose it, according to a new Courier Newsroom/Data for Progress poll.


Need to Know

  • Sixty-one percent of likely voters are “very” or “somewhat” concerned that Trump Republicans will promote violence to achieve political goals in future elections.
  • When reminded of what happened in the weeks leading up to Jan. 6, 57% of voters said Trump bears “a lot” or “some” of the responsibility for the attack on the US Capitol. 
  • Nearly half of all Republicans in the Michigan legislature have used the power of their office to discredit or try to overturn the 2020 election results—efforts that most voters oppose.

MICHIGAN—Nearly 18 months after supporters of former President Donald Trump launched a deadly siege on the US Capitol and tried to overturn the 2020 election results, polling shows that voters remain concerned about the long-term impact of the Jan. 6 attack–and want accountability.

A new Courier Newsroom/Data for Progress poll finds that 61% of likely voters are “very” or “somewhat” concerned that Trump Republicans will promote violence to achieve political goals in future elections. Another 10% are a “little concerned” about the possibility. Only 29% of voters say they’re not concerned at all.

The findings come as the US House Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack will hold the first of six public hearings Thursday night in primetime. 

The hearings are expected to delve into many different aspects of the investigation, including Trump’s promotion of the “Big Lie” that the 2020 election was stolen, his attempt to pressure Vice President Mike Pence to illegally throw out electoral votes for then President-elect Joe Biden, his calls for supporters to assemble in Washington D.C. to “Stop the Steal,” and his failure to call off the violence for more than three hours after the attack on the Capitol began.

Trump’s Republican allies have tried to dismiss the hearings and the House investigation as political gamesmanship, but voters aren’t buying it. Roughly two-thirds of voters (65%) support the House investigation, while 28% oppose it.

The survey also found that most voters blame Trump for what happened on Jan. 6 and believe he should be held accountable.

  • When reminded of what happened in the weeks leading up to Jan. 6, 57% of voters said Trump bears “a lot” or “some” responsibility for the attack. Twenty-nine percent said he bears no responsibility at all. 
  • Fifty-six percent of voters believe individuals and groups—including elected officials like then-president Trump—who helped fuel the attack should be held criminally responsible for what happened that day. 

The hearings are also expected to highlight efforts by Trump’s allies to help keep him in office or return him to office after Biden was inaugurated. 

Since Election Day 2020, Republican lawmakers across the country have tried to discredit or overturn the election results. Congresswoman Lisa McClain and Congressmen Jack Bergman and Tim Walberg, all from Michigan, joined 136 other House Republicans in voting to overturn the 2020 election results. 

More insidious have been the actions of state lawmakers. 

A recent New York Times analysis of nine key swing states, including Michigan, found that 357 sitting Republican politicians—amounting to 44% of all Republican legislators across the nine states—have used the power of their office to discredit or try to overturn the 2020 election results. 

In Michigan, that number is even higher–48% of Republican legislators have taken such actions, which include attempts to delay the vote count, support for lawsuits intended to overturn the election, support for sending alternate slates of electors to Congress (to override the will of voters), and attempts to manually decertify election results—an idea that is actually impossible, according to experts.

Fifty-six percent of voters oppose these efforts, while 33% support them. However, a majority of Republicans polled (54%) approve of such proposals, highlighting the lasting and corrosive impact of the “Big Lie.”

While Republicans have repeatedly cried voter fraud, they’ve failed to provide legitimate proof to back up their claims, and an enormous body of evidence shows there was no widespread fraud during the election.

A December 2021 Associated Press analysis found that Michigan election officials identified only 56 cases of potential voter fraud, representing 0.04% of Biden’s margin of victory. 

The truth has had little impact on the continued spread of the “Big Lie” in Michigan. The state Republican Party endorsed Kristina Karamo, an election-denying conspiracy theorist with a litany of controversial and hate-based comments in her past, as their candidate for Michigan secretary of state. Karamo will face current Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson in the November midterms. If Karamo wins, she would oversee the very elections she’s spent nearly two years spreading misinformation about. Benson has been working with the Jan. 6 committee throughout their investigation.

RELATED: Michigan Secretary of State to Receive JFK ‘Profile in Courage Award’ for Defending 2020 Elections Results

The Michigan GOP also endorsed another outspoken proponent of the “Big Lie,” Matt DePerno, as their nominee for attorney general. DePerno is best known for filing unsuccessful lawsuits challenging 2020 election results in Antrim County, but recent reporting also found that he met with a Trump administration official in the US State Department on Jan. 6 as part of his effort to overturn the election.

While efforts behind the “Big Lie” have repeatedly failed, they’ve achieved a destructive impact on Republicans’ faith in elections. A majority of Republican voters now do not believe Biden was legitimately elected, despite ample evidence to the contrary. Furthermore, supporting Trump’s “Big Lie” has become a litmus test among Republican base voters. The former president has spent much of the past year endorsing candidates who embraced his lies and discredited his 2020 loss.

It’s still a toss-up as to whether repeating the false narratives about 2020 will hurt or help Republicans’ electoral prospects with more moderate voters and independents. 

Slightly more than half of voters polled (51%) viewed the siege at the Capitol and the continued claims that the election was stolen as attacks on the country. Conversely, 39% said the events of Jan. 6 were the result of “legitimate concerns” about the election and were not an attack on the US. And while 51% would win a majority-rules election, the razor-thin margins show things could really go either way in November. 

Further underscoring the uncertainty ahead, 50% of voters said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who still claims the 2020 election was rigged, and 46% said they’d be less likely to vote for a candidate who worked to overturn the 2020 election. 

Roughly one in 5 voters said they’d be more likely to vote for a candidate who continues to argue the election was rigged or has taken steps to put Trump back in office.

Methodology: From May 27 to 31, 2022, Data for Progress conducted a survey of 1,220 likely voters nationally using web panel respondents. The sample was weighted to be representative of likely voters by age, gender, education, race, and voting history. The survey was conducted in English. The margin of error is ±3 percentage points. N=1,220 unless otherwise specified. Some values may not add up to 100 due to rounding.