Healthcare


Shutterstock
Michigan’s Smallest Hospitals Face Uphill Battles During Pandemic. New Grant Money Aims to Help.

The COVID-19 pandemic nearly buried Michigan’s rural hospitals. Grand funding is helping to pull them out. 

Image via Shutterstock
Michigan’s Health Insurance Marketplace Is Now Open. Here’s How to Use it.

The 'Gander addresses nine questions Michiganders have about the Special Enrollment Period for health insurance that began Feb. 15.

Image via Shutterstock
Congress Is on the Verge of Banning Surprise Medical Bills

The average surprise bill for an emergency room visit is $628—a significant amount in a country where most people live paycheck to paycheck.

While Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, doctors, nurses, and healthcare workers will still be on the frontlines of the pandemic.
Before You Have Your Big Thanksgiving, Listen to What These Doctors Have to Say

Doctors, nurses, and healthcare workers will still be on the pandemic frontlines as you celebrate Thanksgiving. They have a plea for Americans this year.

Open enrollment through Healthcare.gov is open until Dec. 15. Image via Shutterstock
Need Health Insurance? The ACA Marketplace Is Now Open Until Dec. 15.

A lot has happened in the past 10 days—so much so that you may not realize that the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment season began on Nov. 1.

Photos by the Associated Press.
The Deeply Personal Health Care Issues at the Center of Michigan’s Senate Race

We look at where Sen. Gary Peters and opponent John James stand on the health issues that matter most to Michiganders.

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on September 30, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump was traveling to Minnesota for a fundraising event and a campaign rally, one day before getting diagnosed with COVID-19. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
The Average American Spends 15 Times More on Health Care Than Trump Paid in Federal Income Taxes in 2017

The average person spent $11,172 on health care in 2018, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services—15 times the amount Trump paid in federal income taxes a year earlier.