History


A traditional pow-wow at Central Michigan University. (photo via cmich.edu)
5 Ways to Acknowledge Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Michigan This Year

Michigan is home to 12 Native Indian tribes, so Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Oct. 10 is a high priority in the Mitten State. And the day is about more than just celebrating history.

The "Tunnel of Trees" is a stretch of M-119 north of Petoskey that's known for some the best views of fall colors in Michigan.
7 Must-Visit Michigan Destinations You Can Get Into for Free

There’s no shortage of fun (and free) things to do in Michigan this fall.

The Hispanic Festival in Grand Rapids is a celebration of West Michigan's Hispanic heritage. (Photo via Hispanic Center of West Michigan)
4 Michigan Towns That You Might Not Know Have a Rich Hispanic History

It’s impossible to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month without also celebrating Hispanic history—and Michigan has a whole lot of it. 

Revelers dance around a maypole at the Michigan Renaissance Festival.
Aaron Meets a Cast of Characters in His Quest To Find Out: What’s the Deal with Renaissance Festivals?

"I had never been to a renaissance festival before, so on a sunny late-summer weekend, I thought I’d check it out. I had so many questions: Should I wear a costume? How many people go to these things? Would I fit in at a place like this?"

Divers explore the A.J. Rogers—or at least what's left of it—off the coast of the Old Mission Peninsula near Traverse City. (Grand Traverse Bay Underwater Preserve via gtbup.org)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The A.J. Rogers

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

This image of The Charles Frank was taken by dipping a camera underwater from the surface. (Chris Roxburgh via Facebook)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The Charles Frank

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

A young striker (left) with suffrage and labor activist Flora Dodge "Fola" La Follette (middle) and social reformer and missionary Rose Livingston (right) during a garment strike in New York City in 1913. (Library of Congress via Unsplash)
Here’s When Women (Finally) Got the Right to Vote in 50 Countries

While it might feel as though it's been an inalienable right for as long as we can remember, it really wasn't that long ago that women not only didn't have the right to vote, but also couldn't own land, travel freely, or work outside the traditional roles prescribed by society.