Stories tagged: "shipwrecks"


Lauren Castle (Photo via Roger LeLievre)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: Lauren Castle

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

Divers explore the Eagle off the coast of Northport near Traverse City. (Chris Roxburgh via Facebook)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The Eagle

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

Divers explore the A.J. Rogers—or at least what's left of it—off the coast of the Old Mission Peninsula near Traverse City. (Grand Traverse Bay Underwater Preserve via gtbup.org)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The A.J. Rogers

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

This image of The Charles Frank was taken by dipping a camera underwater from the surface. (Chris Roxburgh via Facebook)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The Charles Frank

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

Divers explore The Metropolis (Chris Roxburgh via Facebook)
Shipwrecks of Grand Traverse Bay: The Metropolis

Grand Traverse Bay is home to dozens of known shipwrecks, spanning from the early 1800s to the late 1900s. Now a popular vacation area in Michigan, the bay was once a hub for commerce and maritime trade—and like most trade routes, this one has a storied past.

The SS Bannockburn is pictured while in dry deck in 1902. The ship is one of five popular "ghost ships" people claim to still see sailing the Great Lakes. It disappeared in 1902. (Wikipedia Commons Photo)
5 Ghost Ships Believed to Still be Sailing the Great Lakes

Conversations about ghost ships aren’t limited to the Flying Dutchman. The Great Lakes have their fair share of spooky tales, too. 

This undated photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary shows the 266-foot steel-hulled steamer Choctaw.
From Freighter to Historic Site: Remembering the Sinking of the Choctaw

It traversed the Great Lakes for years until sinking in 1915. Now, the Choctaw serves as another of Michigan’s numerous historic sites.