How to get free help:

The AARP Foundation Tax-Aide provides free tax prep in-person or contact-free. Here’s the link to find a site near you. If you want to prepare your tax return yourself but could use some coaching or another pair of eyes during the process, they’ll do that, too. Here’s the link. You do not need to be a member of AARP to use these services.

Want the phone number instead? Here you go: 888-227-7669

The IRS’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program (VITA) is for you. Every person working for this program must take and pass tax law training that meets or exceeds IRS standards—including confidentiality and privacy laws. There’s also a quality review check of the tax return document before it’s filed. 

Here’s the link to find the VITA program near you. 

Want the phone number instead? Here it is: 800-906-9887

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program (VITA) is here for you, too. 

Every person working for this program must take and pass tax law training that meets or exceeds IRS standards—including confidentiality and privacy laws. There’s also a quality review check of the tax return document before it’s filed. 

Here’s the link to find the VITA program near you. 

Want the phone number instead? Here it is: 800-906-9887

FAQs

US citizens and permanent residents who work in the United States need to file a return if they made more than a certain amount of money in 2022. (See next question for that amount.)

If you’re not sure, here’s a tool that can help you figure out if you need to file a return.

This website has a lot of helpful information, so check it out if your situation is more complicated than the ones listed below.

If you are…

Single and under 65: $12,950
Single and 65 or older: $14,700

Head of household and under 65: $19,400
Head of household and 65 or older: $21,150

Married, filing jointly, and both spouses are under 65: $25,900
Married, filing jointly, and one spouse is 65 or older: $27,300
Married, filing jointly, and both spouses are 65 or older: $28,700

Married, filing separately, at any age: $5

A qualified surviving spouse and under 65: $25,900
A qualified surviving spouse and 65 or older: $27,300

Note: If you were born before Jan. 2, 1958, you’re considered 65 or older.

Most people need to file their tax returns by April 15 each year. However, some people use different calendars for sending tax information to the IRS. Others may want to get an extension to their filing date. If you think those special circumstances apply to you, go here for more information


It can be confusing to know how to classify yourself on your taxes—that’s what’s known as your “filing status.” It changes depending on if you’re married, if you file one tax return for both spouses, and more. Here’s an IRS tool that will help you figure out your filing status.

Here’s what the IRS says:

Consider your spouse to be 65 or older at the end of 2022 only if your spouse was 65 or older at the time of death. Even if your spouse was born before January 2, 1958, your spouse isn’t considered 65 or older at the end of 2022 unless your spouse was 65 or older at the time of death

A person is considered to reach age 65 on the day before the person’s 65th birthday.

Example: 

Your spouse was born on February 14, 1957, and died on February 13, 2022. Your spouse is considered age 65 at the time of death. However, if your spouse died on February 12, 2022, your spouse isn’t considered age 65 at the time of death and should not be considered 65 or older at the end of 2022.

For more information, see Final Income Tax Return for Decedent—Form 1040 or 1040-SR in Pub. 559.

Older adults, and those who are retired, have special considerations, like qualifying for certain tax credits, reporting pension income, and potentially paying a retirement tax. Go to this website for help. Remember, the AARP offers a free tax services, so check out their website to find a program near you.

The IRS has set up a tool to help you find out if you can claim someone as a dependent on your taxes. Here it is.

The IRS has set up a special tool to help you find out. Here it is.

Lots. There are tax credits for families, homeowners, people who own electric vehicles, and others.

There are also deductions you can make against the taxes you owe: healthcare deductions, work-related deductions, education deductions, and more.

Here’s a page where you can learn more.

Here’s the link to the IRS’s dedicated tax center for you. There, you can learn about employment taxes, deducting expenses, business tax credits, and more.

Thank you for your service! Members of the armed forces have special tax benefits and circumstances. 

Find out if you’re eligible for military tax benefits here. 

Here’s the IRS’s page on military family tax benefits, for dependents of people in the military. 

This is a guide for active duty military and reserve personnel. 

If you’re a disabled veteran, look for special tax considerations here.

This is a general tax information page for all current and former members of the military.

Did you have a baby? Change your job? Get married? Retire? File for bankruptcy? Move? Lots of life events can make filing taxes feel more complicated. Here’s the IRS’s hub for managing taxes after a major life event. 

If you’ve changed addresses before filing your return, enter the new address on the return when you file. That will automatically update your records.

If you’ve changed your address after filing your return, start by telling the post office. Then, fill out whichever form(s) is right for you below:

Form 8822, Change of Address (for Individual, Gift, Estate, or Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax Returns)

Form 8822-B, Change of Address or Responsible Party — Business 

If you prefer, you can write to the IRS directly. Go to this link for more information.

You can also call the IRS to let them know you’ve changed addresses. 

If you’re getting a refund and you filed electronically, you’ll usually receive the payment within 3 weeks of the date when the IRS received your return. 

If you mailed paper returns, it can take six weeks or so to process your refund. 

A helpful tool for tracking your refund is right here.

Here’s an Interactive Tax Assistant tool you can use to ask questions and find helpful information. 

Here in Michigan...

There are state and federal taxes. The Michigan Department of Treasury has a website that will help you with all of your state tax return needs. It’ll also help you figure out where your refund is, change your address, view your estimated payments, and get one-on-one help. You’ll get answers to any questions you have within 24-28 hours, and can see your real-time tax refund status 24/7. Here’s the link.

Here’s the link for Michigan forms, plus the place to pay your income taxes online.

That’s right, there are federal, state, and city income taxes—but only in some cities. Those are:

Albion, Battle Cree, Benton Harbor, Big Rapids, Detroit, East Lansing, Flint, Grand Rapids, Grayling, Hamtramck, Highland Park, Hudson, Ionia, Jackson, Lansing, Lapeer, Muskegon, Muskegon Heights, Pontiac, Port Huron, Portland, Saginaw, Springfield, and Walker. Here’s the link to their forms.